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East African Educational Publishers

EAEP started in 1965 when two British publishers, Heinemann and Cassell, formed groundwork for publishing in Nairobi. In those days, the whole of Africa used to be a marketplace where books published in European metropolises were transported to and sold.

In 1968, Heinemann Educational Books (EA) Limited changed its name to Heinemann (Kenya) Ltd when part of it became locally owned. In 1972, our company Chairman, Dr. Henry Chakava, was appointed as the first African Editor at Heinemann. He took this opportunity to start publishing titles by local authors for schools, mid-level colleges, universities and the general reading public.

In 1992, twenty four years after the company started, EAEP became the first multinational publishing firm to enjoy full local ownership, and thereby changed its name to East African Educational Publishers.

From then on, we have moved from heights to heights.  The leadership of Dr. Chakava gained international recognition when Oxford Brooks University honoured him with a doctorate for his indefatigable contribution to publishing not only in the African continent, but also on the international scene.

EAEP has grown by leaps and bounds to be the leading school and general publisher in the region; with books covering areas of education, culture, development, aesthetics, literature, drama and poetry.

Our collection of literature books in English, Kiswahili and indigenous languages continue to inspire generations of readers year after year.


The Parrot And The Pen By Waweru Mwangu

At this level, learners are developing knowledge on alphabets. They are learning to identify and decode language patterns. Simple and repetitive structures are needed to help learners develop accuracy in word reading. Left-to-right reading is developed and learners read slowly and aloud. Stories are based on one idea only.

This is a story about a parrot that says what she hears and hides items. It is a funny story to read.

 


Fruits We Eat By Charity Shimuli Oketch

Learners at this level need simple read aloud books to develop their oral skills and print awareness. Texts with single words help learners at this level to match spoken words with print. The learners are also learning to distinguish letters and to name them. Left-to-right orientation in reading is developed.

Fruits we Eat is a reader that talks about the common fruits that the learners eat. Learners will be able to identify the various fruits that they usually eat.


The Broken Glasses by Waweru Mwangi

At this level, learners are starting to read more fluently. Learners are able to read longer texts without much reliance on pictures to identify words. The focus of the learner at this level is more on comprehension than decoding.

The Broken Glasses is a story about Mary and Maria.  These two girls are friends. Maria wears spectacles and Mary thinks that wearing spectacles makes Maria look beautiful and hardworking. She borrows the spectacles from Maria so that she too can look beautiful and hardworking. Unfortunately, she breaks them. From the story, learners will learn to be responsible.


My Shapes by Charity Shimuli Oketch

Learners at this level need simple read aloud books to develop their oral skills and print awareness. Texts with single words help learners at this level to match spoken words with print. The learners are also learning to distinguish letters and to name them. Left-to-right orientation in reading is developed.

My Shapes is a reader that introduces learners to shapes. This book will aid the development of learners’ sense of sight and manipulation skills.


To place your order, please  send an email to warehouse@eastafricanpublishers.com or reach us on facebook or mobile no: 0722205661


 

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